24 Dec 2006

Bono the case against

Graham Norton, not always the first person I look to for an opinion, got it right when he said "He goes to hell and back to avoid paying tax. He has a special accountant. He works out Irish tax loopholes. And then he's asking me to buy a well for an African village. "Tarmac the road outside your house, you tight-wad! Or pay for a school in Ireland." The scounging sycophant shifted a big portion of his assets to the Netherlands to benefit from that country's lower rate of tax folllowing in that fine Irish tradition of moralising tax evaders like Charles Haughey and then drones on

This is from Liam Macuid's excellent blog...his account of the problems of anarcho squatter organisation, at a difficult meeting on Mexico he went to, is worth redading about, anarcho anti-capitalism certainly has a track record in delivering some radical opposition but forms of organisation used can be frustrating and undemocratic but then so can more formal political meetings. Certainly the anarchos at their best are better than the traditional far left.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Derek you can't be suggesting that there is a case for Bono. Have a good Christmas.

Anonymous said...

Derek you can't be suggesting that there is a case for Bono. Have a good Christmas.

Anonymous said...

In my opinion, the best thing a philanthropist can do is to avoid as much tax as possible - so that they can decide where it will do the most good, instead of the state.

If I pay a pound of tax, a large proportion of it is going to things I don't agree with. If I put it towards a good project, I know that 100% of my pound is being well spent.

The great thing about this is that, if you decide to fund a particular project via a charity, you can gift aid it. So not only do you avoid paying tax, but you actually take tax money for your preferred project.

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