11 Dec 2006

Green Party Principal Speaker attacks "energy apartheid"

Here is todays story, also been working on a response to the economist editorial on why ethical food is unethical, i will argue that while we need radical change, ethical food is in fact ethical...especially the organic leeks I grow in my garden!

NEWS: Green Party in England & Wales

Green Party Principal Speaker attacks "energy apartheid"

In a major speech to the London Federation of Green Parties at the University of London Union on Monday 11th December, Dr Wall will call for an end to 'energy apartheid' along with demands for a carbon neutral future.

Dr. Wall, speaking after the recent pre-budget report, commented: "We have to offer positive low cost alternatives to prevent global warming, otherwise the emerging consensus over green taxes will lead to energy apartheid. Those on lower incomes will see their cost of living fall as their tax burden rises, while those on higher incomes will continue to consume carbon as if there was no tomorrow.

"It is shocking that while road pricing is likely to be introduced across Britain, rail fares including those regulated by the government are rising sharply above inflation. Bus and rail prices are 60% higher in real terms than they were in 1975, we cannot and should not price people out of their cars and off of public transport at the same time. (1)

"We need to use the money from green taxes and from scrapping new motorways and Trident to build crossrail and other vital projects, we need to be slashing fares for bus and rail. The Green Partys' plans to phase out VAT and replace it with ecotaxes would be one way of reducing our collective environmental impact without making the poor pay more.

"Globally we must defend those with the most ecological lifestyles from enclosure, while making sure that carbon off set schemes do not lead to injustice and ecological damage.

"We need to promote diverse, ecologically sustainable, localised economies. We can meet the needs of future generations without making the poor pay, but this will demand imaginative policies and practical solidarity.

"Market-based instruments, essentially involving carbon taxes and global emissions trading, are blunt as a means to achieve environmental sustainability. This is because they do not address the need for deeper social changes, let alone offer a framework for social justice.


ENDS

Notes for Editors

Dr Wall will be speaking at 6.30 at ULU, for further information please contact London Fed Co-ordinator Noel Lynch on 07961 441722

(1) After Stern: Towards a Climate Change Budget Pre-Budget Report 2006, FOE, p 6





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2 comments:

Binlinus said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Binlinus said...

Hi Derek (sorry 1st post broke the html)

First congrats on getting elected :-)

There are a couple of problems with your review of Stern et al and your review in Red Pepper.

You criticise (rightly) Stern for supporting carbon-trading but at the same time support "Contraction and Convergence" promoted by the Global Commons Institute which also supports emmisions-trading, saying: "Full international emissions trading would be possible so that countries with low per capita emissions could sell
their spare permits to countries unable to manage within their shares.
This would allow an efficient and flexible approach, as called for by the US, and would also give developing
countries an incentive to invest the proceeds in clean technology since this would give them more permits to sell."

At the same time you support the Durban Group for Climate Justice who (rightly) criticise carbon-trading and you recommend the (excellent) critique of carbon-trading by the Corner House Group

You can't support the C&C if you are against carbon-trading. So what's your position?

Bin