11 Feb 2007

Green Party Principal Speaker's shocking drugs admission

Dr Derek Wall, 41, has admitted after huge public pressure, to his closest collegues in the Green Left 'that I didn't take drugs at school'.

Dr Wall who was elected Principal Speaker in 2006 after a 26 year career in the party was forced into this embarrassing admission that could cost him dear in any future contest for the top joint post in the Party, after pressure from prominent Party members and the press.

Shane Collins
the Green Party drugs czar, who coordinates the politically powerful Party Drugs Working Group refused to comment on Dr Wall's plight.

Dr Wall remains defiant, 'The fact that I didn't smoke cannabis at my school Corsham comprehensive in Wiltshire 1977-1983, does not mean that I am not fit to be Principal Speaker. Many other prominent party members [Dr Wall refused to name them] failed to take drugs at school, it doesn't mean that you can't represent the party. Frankly I don't think the public care. I do think it is hurtful to have my record compared with that of Conservative leader David Cameron, his childhood unlike mine was one of priviledge, things that were normal at Eton, were distant to those of us in state education in towns north of Melksham.'

Critics have argued that Dr Wall has not been doing enough to spell out Party policies such as the decriminalisation in the face of David Cameron's latest policy moves.

He insisted his position was secured but promised to revise his priorities,'I will work more closely with the Drugs group in the Party, it's an important policy area and we can't leave all the work to David Cameron and his shadow Cabinet. The Lib Dems and even some Labour MPs are trying to cherry pick our most popular policies. A green future though requires real committment and practical action, this is only possible with a real green party.'

2 comments:

Lawrie Coombs said...

David Cameron is playing games here, people from his background are hardly unknown to partake of narcotics, illicit sexual misdemeanours and experimentation more generally. Cameron plays to this audience and the increasing maturity in society with regards to consideing attitudes around drug use.

However the two faced 'I was young and stupid' line keeps him within the boundaries of his daily mail voter base.

Meanwhile as the dinner parties of South Ken are awash with stockbrokers snorting coke, it is the black kid smoking a joint or the inabitants of ex-industrial council estates trying to make a few quid selling you whatever you want that feel the full force of the law.

Derek is right to point out the sea of hypocrisy when it comes to issues around drug use - in a world where the reaction to e-driven rave/culture culture of the 90s was for corporations to produce alco-pops and promote binge drinking and where moralising replaces real discussion on our own individual pathways to enjoyment and the living of fulfilling lives.

Drug use, broadly defined, is as natural as kicking a ball about. The attitude of the Green Party is to be congratulated on many fronts in this area, from the ecstasy testing kits it has produced in the past to the developing of a policy that has more to do with consideration human/social need rather than that of capital.

Peter said...

:) - good post derek.